Curry Chandler

Curry Chandler is a writer, researcher, and independent scholar working in the field of communication and media studies. His writing on media theory and policy has been published in the popular press as well as academic journals. Curry approaches the study of communication from a distinctly critical perspective, and with a commitment to addressing inequality in power relations. The scope of his research activity includes media ecology, political economy, and the critique of ideology.

Curry is a graduate student in the Communication Department at the University of Pittsburgh, having previously earned degrees from Pepperdine University and the University of Central Florida.

Society of the spectacles: Varying views on Google's goggles

This week Google released a video depicting what it might be like to wear their augmented reality glasses, known as Project Glass: [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9c6W4CCU9M4&w=560&h=315]

A bloke named Tom Scott released his own vision of what the Google goggle experience might be like, envisioning technologically-enhanced ways of getting injured:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3TAOYXT840&w=560&h=315]

Youtuber rebelliouspixels remixed the original Google video to depict the Google goggle experience with the ADdition of Google adverts:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mRF0rBXIeg&w=560&h=315]

Via a link on Metafilter I came across this delightful video posted a year ago on vimeo by Keiichi Matsuda. Titled Augmented (hyper)Reality: Domestic Robocop the video is a fantastic POV depiction of a possible experience with augmented reality eyewear.

More coverage of Project Glass and its AI elements from CNet:

For the most part, the augmented-reality glasses do what a person could do with a smartphone, such as look up information and socialize. But the demo also shows glimpses of an artificial-intelligence (AI) system working behind the scenes. It's the AI system that could make mobile devices, including wearable computers, far more powerful and take on more complex tasks, according to an expert.